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  Educators Course Syllabi History, Segel-The Cold War

The Cold War
History 303
Edward Segel

email: Edward.Segel@reed.edu

 

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Bookstore List (in approximate order of use):

  • Walter LaFeber, America, Russia, and the Cold War, 1945-1992.7th ed., 1993. McGraw-Hill, $20.35.
  • Melvyn P. Leffler, A Preponderance of Power: National Security, the Truman Administration, and the Cold War. Stanford U. P., 1992, $22.95.
  • Melvyn R. Leffler and David S. Painter (eds.), Origins of the Cold War: An International History. Routledge, 1994, $16.95.
  • Peter G. Boyle, American-Soviet Relations: From the Russian Revolution to the Fall of Communism. Routledge, 1993, $18.95.
  • Ronald Powaski, March to Armageddon: The United States and the Nuclear Arms Race, 1939 to the Present. Oxford U. P., 1989, $9.95.
  • Kenneth M. Jensen (ed.), Origins of the Cold War: The Novikov, Kennan, and Roberts "Long Telegrams" of 1946. Rev. ed., 1993. United States Institute of Peace, $10.95.
  • Ernest R. May (ed.), American Cold War Strategy: Interpreting NSC-68. St. Martin, 1993, $10.65.
  • James A. Nathan (ed.), The Cuban Missile Crisis Revisited. St. Martin, 1992, $17.95.
  • George Herring, America's Longest War: The United States and Vietnam, 1950-1975. 3rd. ed., 1995. McGraw-Hill, $17.35.
  • Stephen J. Whitfield, The Culture of the Cold War. Johns Hopkins, 1991, $13.95.
  • David Holloway, The Soviet Union and the Arms Race. 2nd ed., 1984. Yale, $12.00.
  • Michael J. Hogan (ed.), The End of the Cold War: Its Meaning and Implications. Cambridge, 1992, $15.95.
  • Recommended: Any good historical atlas, like Hammond's Atlas of World History

For general familiarity with the history of Europe in this period, consult as needed the appropriate sections of any good textbook. Particularly recommended: R. R. Palmer and Joel Colton,A History of the Modern World (the second paperback volume,Since 1815 )-many copies on Bookstore Reserve for Humanities 220; or Robert Paxton, Europe in the Twentieth Century; or Gordon Craig, Europe since 1815 (1961 ed.)-many copies of both Paxton and Craig in the Multiple Copy Room.

Books available only on Bookstore Reserve

  • Gordon Craig and Alexander George, Force and Statecraft: Diplomatic Problems of Our Time.
  • Michael Howard, The Causes of Wars.
  • Thomas G. Paterson and Robert McMahon (eds.), The Origins of the Cold War. (1970 and 1991 eds.)
  • Martin Sherwin, A World Destroyed: The Atomic Bomb and the Grand Alliance. (1977 ed.)
  • Martin Sherwin, A World Destroyed: Hiroshima and the Origins of the Arms Race. (1987 ed.)
  • Gar Alperovitz, Atomic Diplomacy. (1985 and 1995 eds.)
  • Gar Alperovitz, The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb: and the Architecture of an American Myth.
  • Thomas B. Allen and Norman Polmar, Code-Name Downfall: The Secret Plan to Invade Japan and Why Truman Dropped the Bomb.
  • George Kennan, American Diplomacy, 1900-1950.
  • George Kennan, Russia and the West under Lenin and Stalin.
  • Adam Ulam, Expansion and Coexistence: The History of Soviet Foreign Policy, 1917-1973.
  • Dmitri Volkogonov, Stalin: Triumph and Tragedy.
  • Stephen Ambrose, Rise to Globalism: American Foreign Policy since 1938 (1988 ed.)
  • John Lewis Gaddis, The United States and the Origins of the Cold War, 1941-1947.
  • Thomas McCormick, America's Half-Century: U. S. Foreign Policy in the Cold War and After. (1989 and 1995 eds.)
  • William Appleman Williams, The Tragedy of American Diplomacy. (1972 ed.)
  • Lloyd C. Gardner, Architects of Illusion: Men and Ideas in American Foreign Policy, 1941-1949.
  • Anthony Short, The Origins of the Vietnam War.
  • Marc Trachtenberg, History and Strategy.

Weekly Reading Assignments (about 200-250 pages a week):

1. Week of January 22: Introduction: Schools of Interpretation; Background to 1945

  • Michael Howard, "The Causes of Wars" and "The Strategic Approach to International Relations," in The Causes of Wars, pp. 7-22, 36-48.
  • Peter G. Boyle,American-Soviet Relations: From the Russian Revolution to the Fall of Communism, Preface, chapters 1-5.
  • John Lewis Gaddis, "The Emerging Post-Revisionist Synthesis on the Origins of the Cold War," and Responses (Diplomatic History, vol. 7:3 [summer 1983], pp. 171-204; in Reserve file folders).
  • Gordon Craig and Alexander George, Force and Statecraft: Diplomatic Problems of Our Time, chapter 9, "The Cold War as International System."
  • Walter LaFeber, America, Russia, and the Cold War, 1945-1992 (7th ed.), Introduction, chapters 1-2.

Further useful reading:
  • Charles S. Maier, "Revisionism and the Interpretation of Cold War Origins" (originally published in Perspectives in American History, vol. IV [1970]; in Reserve file folders).

2. Week of January 29: Issues of the Bomb: Hiroshima; the Baruch Plan

  • Melvyn P. Leffler, A Preponderance of Power: National Security, the Truman Administration, and the Cold War, Preface, Introduction, chapters 1-3.
  • Ronald Powaski, March to Armageddon: The United States and the Nuclear Arms Race, 1939 to the Present, chapters 1-3.
  • Melvyn Leffler and David S. Painter (eds.), Origins of the Cold War: An International History, chapter 3 (article by Martin Sherwin).
  • Martin J. Sherwin, A World Destroyed, Introductions to the 1st ed. and to the 2nd ed. (both in the 2nd ed.).
  • Gar Alperovitz, "Hiroshima: Historians Reassess" (Foreign Policy, no. 99 [Summer 1995], pp. 15-34; and in Reserve files).
  • Barton J. Bernstein, "Understanding the Atomic Bomb and the Japanese Surrender: Missed Opportunities, Little-Known Near Disasters, and Modern Memory" (Diplomatic History, vol. 19:2 [Spring 1995], pp. 227-273; and in Reserve files).
  • J. Samuel Walker, "The Decision to Use the Bomb: A Historiographical Update" (Diplomatic History, vol. 14:1 [Winter 1990], pp. 97-114; and in Reserve files).
  • Herbert P. Bix, "Japan's Delayed Surrender: A Reinterpretation," (Diplomatic History, vol. 19:2 [Spring 1995], pp. 197-225; and in Reserve files).
Further useful reading:
  • The remaining articles in "Hiroshima in History and Memory: A Symposium" (Diplomatic History, vol. 19:2 [Spring 1995]).

3. Week of February 5: Hiroshima (cont.); Emerging Hostility&emdash;Documents of 1946

  • Leffler, chapters 3 (remainder) and 4.
  • Kenneth M. Jensen (ed.), Origins of the Cold War: The Novikov, Kennan, and Roberts "Long Telegrams" of 1946 (rev. ed.) (all).
  • George Kennan, "The Sources of Soviet Conduct" (the "Mr. X" article, Foreign Affairs, July 1947, reprinted in George Kennan, American Diplomacy, 1900-1950, pp. 89-106.
Further useful reading:
  • George Kennan, Memoirs, 1925-1950, chapters 1, 11-15.
  • Lloyd Gardner, Architects of Illusion, chapter 10.

4. Week of February 12: The Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan

  • LaFeber, chapters 3-4.
  • Leffler, chapters 4-5.
  • Leffler and Painter, chapters 2, 6-10 (articles by MccGwire, Reynolds, Kent, Maier, Gati, Wood).

5. Week of February 19: The Cold War in Europe; NSC-68

  • Leffler, chapters 6 (pp. 260-265 only), 7, 8.
  • Ernest R. May (ed.), American Cold War Strategy: Interpreting NSC-68. (all)
Further useful reading:
  • Leffler and Painter, chapter 5 (article by Marc Trachtenberg).

6. Week of February 26: NSC-68 (cont.); Hot War in Korea

  • LaFeber, chapters 5-6.
  • Leffler, chapters 9-10.
  • Boyle, chapters 6-7.

Mid-semester examination on the material into 1950 on Monday, March 4.

7. Week of March 4: The Cold War at Home

  • Boyle, chapter 7.
  • Stephen J. Whitfield, The Culture of the Cold War. (all; chapters 4-5 may be skimmed)

After the conclusion of the Army-McCarthy hearings, the class will adjourn for the Spring Recess (week of March 11).

8. Week of March 18: The Leffler Debate; the 1950's

  • Leffler, chapter 11 (pp. 485-493 only), Conclusion.
  • Lynn Eden, "The End of U. S. Cold War History?" (review essay on Leffler-International Security, vol. 18:1 [Summer 1993], pp. 174-207; and in Reserve files).
  • Bruce Cumings, "'Revising Postrevisionism,' or, The Poverty of Theory in Diplomatic History" (Diplomatic History, vol. 17:4 [Fall 1993], pp. 539-569; and in Reserve files).
  • LaFeber, chapters 7-9.
  • Boyle, chapter 10.

9. Week of March 25: The Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962

  • LaFeber, chapter 10.
  • James A. Nathan (ed.), The Cuban Missile Crisis Revisited, chapters 1-6.

10. Week of April 1: Vietnam

  • LaFeber, chapter 11.
  • George Herring, America's Longest War: The United States and Vietnam, 1950-1975 (3rd ed.) (all-chapters 3, 6, and 7 may be skimmed).

Further useful reading:
  • Leffler and Painter, chapter 13 (article by Michael H. Hunt and Steven I. Levine).
  • Anthony Short, The Origins of the Vietnam War. (Bookstore Reserve)

 

11. Week of April 8: The Arms Race: The Soviet Side

  • Boyle, chapters 11-14.
  • David Holloway, The Soviet Union and the Arms Race (2nd ed.) (chapters 4 and 7 may be omitted).

 

12. Week of April 15: The Arms Race: SALT; the Cold War Winds Down

  • Powaski, chapters 7-11, Conclusion.
  • LaFeber, chapters 12-13.
  • Boyle, chapters 15-17.

13. Week of April 22: Inconclusive Conclusion

  • Geir Lundestad, "Moralism, Presentism, Exceptionalism, Provincialism, and Other Extravagances in American Writings on the Early Cold War Years" (Diplomatic History, vol. 13:4 [Fall 1989], pp.527-545; and in Reserve files).
  • John Lewis Gaddis, "The Tragedy of Cold War History" (SHAFR Presidential Address, December 1992, Diplomatic History, vol. 17:1 [Winter 1993], pp. 1-16; and in Reserve files).
  • Melvyn P. Leffler, "New Approaches, Old Interpretations, and Prospective Reconfigurations" (SHAFR Presidential Address, January 1995, Diplomatic History, vol. 19:2 [Spring 1995], pp. 173-196; and in Reserve files).
  • Michael J. Hogan (ed.), The End of the Cold War: Its Meaning and Implications. (selections)

Further useful reading:
  • John Lewis Gaddis, The Long Peace: Inquiries into the History of the Cold War. (1987)
  • John Lewis Gaddis, The United States and the End of the Cold War: Implications, Reconsiderations, Provocations. (1992)

A term paper (about 10 pages) will be due on Wednesday, May 1 (details to be announced). There will also be a final examination.

Maintained by: Bookstore-www@reed.edu Last modified 23 October 1997